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Kids Home Alone

Kids Home Alone? Follow These Safety Steps…

For many of these kids, a return to school also means being home alone after school until their parents get home from work.

School bells are ringing in a new school year and across the country kids are returning to the classroom. For many of these kids, a return to school also means being home alone after school until their parents get home from work.

The American Red Cross has steps parents and children can take to make these after-school hours safer and less stressful.

The first thing parents need to decide is if their child is responsible enough to stay home alone. If not, other options include after-school child care, programs at schools and youth clubs, or enrolling the child in youth sports programs.

Whether a child is going to stay home alone should depend on the child’s maturity and comfort level. A general rule of thumb is that no child less than eight years of age should be left alone for any extended period of time.

If the child is going to go home after school, it’s a good idea to have them call to check in when they get home. For an older child, set ground rules about whether other kids can come over when the parents are absent, whether cooking is an option, whether they can leave the home. Other steps parents can take include:

  • Post an emergency phone list where the children can see it. Include 9-1-1, the parents work and cell numbers, numbers for neighbors, and the numbers for anyone else who is close and trusted. • Practice an emergency plan with the child so they know what to do in case of fire, injury, or other emergencies. Write the plan down and make sure the child knows where it is. • If children have approved access to smart phones or tablets, download the free Red Cross First Aid App so they’ll have instant access to expert advice for everyday emergencies. • Download the Red Cross Emergency App on smart phones or tablets for adults and children. This app gives real-time weather alerts and safety information, including steps on what to do if the alert goes off. The “Family Safe” feature allows parents to check in with their children via text message to see if they are safe or need help. • Let children know where the flashlights are. Make sure that the batteries are fresh, and that the child knows how to use them. • Remove or safely store in locked areas dangerous items like guns, knives, hand tools, power tools, razor blades, scissors, ammunition and other objects that can cause injury. • Make sure potential poisons like detergents, polishes, pesticides, care-care fluids, lighter fluid and lamp oils are stored in locked cabinets or out of the reach of children. • Make sure medicine is kept in a locked storage place or out of the reach of children. • Install safety covers on all unused electrical outlets. • Limit any cooking a young child can do. Make sure at least one approved smoke alarm is installed and operating on each level of the home. • Limit the time the child spends in front of the television or computer. Caution them to not talk about being home alone on public web sites. Kids should be cautious about sharing information about their location when using chat rooms or posting on social networks. • Consider enrolling older children in an online Red Cross babysitting course so they can learn first aid skills and how to care for younger family members. Babysitting Basics is geared towards children aged 11-15 while Advanced Child Care Training is well-suited for those aged 16 and up.

SAFETY STEPS FOR CHILDREN

When talking to kids about being at home alone, parents should stress the following steps and post them somewhere to remind the child about what they should, or shouldn’t, do until mom or dad get home:

  • Lock the doors and if the home has an electronic security system, children should learn how to turn it on and have it on when home alone. • Never open the door to strangers. Always check before opening the door to anyone, looking out through a peephole or window first. • Never open the door to delivery people or service representatives. Ask delivery people to leave the package at the door or tell them to come back at another time. Service representatives, such as a TV cable installer, should have an appointment when an adult is home. • Never tell someone on the telephone that the parents are not at home. Say something like “He or she is busy right now. Can I take a message?” • Do not talk about being home alone on social media web sites. Kids should be cautious about sharing information about their location when using chat rooms or posting on social networks. • Never leave the house without permission. If it’s okay to go outside, children should tell their parents where they are going, when they are leaving, and when they will return. If mom and dad are still at work, children should call them when they return home. • Do not go outside to check out an unusual noise. If the noise worries the child, they should call their parents, an adult, or the police. • Don’t talk to strangers. • Do not have friends over to visit when your parents aren’t at home unless you have permission to do so. • Do not let anyone inside who is using drugs or alcohol, even if you know them. • If the child smells smoke or hears a fire or smoke alarm, they should get outside and ask a neighbor to call the fire department.

American Red Cross

Kids home alone

Keep Kids Safe

How to Keep Kids Safe as They Head Back to School…

Put safety at the top of the list when getting kids ready for school.

Summer vacation is drawing to a close and pretty soon the bells will be ringing to mark a new school year. The American Red Cross has steps that everyone can take to make the trip back to the classroom safer.

Keeping children safe is the top priority, especially for younger children and those heading to school for the first time. Parents should take the following steps:

  • Make sure the child knows their phone number, address, how to get in touch with their parents at work, how to get in touch with another trusted adult and how to dial 9-1-1. • Teach children not to talk to strangers or accept rides from someone they don’t know.

SCHOOL BUS SAFETY If children ride a bus to school, they should plan to get to their bus stop early and stand away from the curb while waiting for the bus to arrive. Other safety steps for students include:

  • Board the bus only after it has come to a complete stop and the driver or attendant has instructed you to get on. • Only board your bus and never an alternate one. • Always stay in clear view of the bus driver and never walk behind the bus. • Cross the street at the corner, obeying traffic signals and staying in the crosswalk. • Never dart out into the street, or cross between parked cars.

WHAT DRIVERS SHOULD KNOW Drivers should be aware that children are out walking or biking to school and slow down, especially in residential areas and school zones. Motorists should know what the yellow and red bus signals mean. Yellow flashing lights indicate the bus is getting ready to stop and motorists should slow down and be prepared to stop. Red flashing lights and an extended stop sign indicate the bus is stopped and children are getting on or off. Drivers in both directions must stop their vehicles and wait until the lights go off, the stop sign is back in place and the bus is moving before they can start driving again.

GET TO SCHOOL SAFELY If children ride in a car to get to school, they should always wear a seat belt. Younger children should use car seats or booster seats until the lap-shoulder belt fits properly (typically for children ages 8-12 and over 4’9”), and ride in the back seat until they are at least 13 years old.

If a teenager is going to drive to school, parents should mandate that they use seat belts. Drivers should not use their cell phone to text or make calls, and should avoid eating or drinking while driving. Some students ride their bike to school. They should always wear a helmet and ride on the right in the same direction as the traffic is going.

When children are walking to school, they should only cross the street at an intersection, and use a route along which the school has placed crossing guards. Parents should walk young children to school, along with children taking new routes or attending new schools, at least for the first week to ensure they know how to get there safely. Arrange for the kids to walk to school with a friend or classmate.

TAKE A FIRST AID CLASS Red Cross training can give you the confidence and skills to help with everyday emergencies from paper cuts to school sports injuries. A variety courses are available. Download the free Red Cross First Aid App so you’ll have access to expert advice whenever and wherever you need it.

American Red Cross

keep kids safe

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